Montgomery County Council Enacts Legislation Amending the County’s Ban the Box Law

Michael NearyMichael Neary

Well that happened fast. As discussed in my prior article, the Montgomery County Council was considering a bill to amend the County’s Ban the Box law first introduced in late July. Since mid-September, the Council was awaiting a report on the merits of the bill from the Health & Human Services and Public Safety Committees. The Council received that report on November 10 and promptly voted to pass the bill the same day. The County Executive signed the bill quickly thereafter on November 20. The amendments to the County’s Ban the Box law become effective on February 19, 2021.

The sole change to the draft bill recommended by the two committees was to prohibit employers from considering a conviction for a first offense of misdemeanor Second Degree Assault instead of the prior language prohibiting employers from considering a misdemeanor or felony Second Degree Assault conviction when making employment decisions.

During the November 10, 2020 hearing on the bill, two further changes to the draft legislation were approved by the Council. First, Council Member Jawando moved to amend the bill so that it would apply to any employer with one employee, even if part-time, in the County. Previously, the bill stated it applied if an employer had one full-time employee in the County. This amendment passed 9-0. Second, Council Member Albornoz moved to remove entirely a first conviction of Second Degree Assault from the list of offenses that an employer can never ask about. The expressed rationale behind this amendment was that a misdemeanor Second Degree Assault conviction often arises from a domestic violence offense. Council Member Albornoz’s amendment to the bill passed 5-4. The Council then voted to pass the amended bill 9-0.

As such, once the bill becomes effective, any employer employing one individual, even if part-time, in the County will have to comply with the mandates of the Ban the Box law. All such employers will have to wait until after the employer makes a conditional offer of employment before asking about criminal histories or running criminal background checks. Further, employers can no longer ask about or consider the following criminal offenses:

  1. Any arrest records that did not lead to a conviction;
  2. A first conviction for:
    a. Trespass; or
    b. Disturbing the peace.
  3. A conviction for a misdemeanor if at least three years have passed since:
    a. The date of conviction; and
    b. The date any period of incarceration for the misdemeanor has ended;
  4. Juvenile records deemed confidential by statute; or
  5. Convictions that have been expunged.

Employers also cannot inquire about these offenses when considering current employees for promotions.

The legislation delegates to the County Executive responsibility for preparing implementing regulations and regulations necessary to notify employees and employers of their rights and responsibilities under the legislation.

Employers in Montgomery County should act now to update their hiring processes to ensure compliance with the amendments to the County’s Ban the Box law before they go into effect on February 19, 2021.

For more information, contact Michael at 301-657-0740 or mjneary@lerchearly.com.

Maryland Employers Must End the Inquiry into Applicant Wage History

They Also Must Provide Applicants with Wage Ranges for Open Positions

Julie ReddigJulie Reddig

The Maryland legislature has joined approximately 25 other state and local jurisdictions in restricting employer use of applicant pay history to determine future pay if the applicant is hired for a position. Instead, Maryland employers must set pay ranges for open positions based on job-specific criteria, without regard to an applicant’s prior earnings.

Specifically, Maryland employers are prohibited from requesting that applicants provide prior pay information. In addition, employers cannot rely on prior pay information voluntarily provided by job applicants except in one narrow exception: when the applicant seeks to negotiate a higher wage than the one offered by the employer.

In that situation, the employer can seek to confirm an applicant’s prior pay and also rely on wage history voluntarily provided by the applicant in order to support the employer making an offer higher than the one initially provided. However, the employer can only make this higher offer if it does not create an unlawful pay differential in violation of Maryland’s equal pay law.

There is no prohibition on an applicant voluntarily disclosing prior pay information. In addition, Maryland employers may still request that an applicant provide a desired pay range if hired for the position.

The law also requires that Maryland employers provide an applicant with the wage range for an open position when the applicant makes such a request.

The goal of this legislation is to ensure that compensation is based on the criteria that is important for the job, such as qualifications, market factors, and the job duties themselves, and end the pay disparities in wages paid to women and minorities.

As a result of this new law, Maryland employers should:

  • Review their job applications to ensure that the application does not request prior compensation information;
  • Train recruiters, managers, and others involved in the hiring process not to request prior pay information of applicants; and
  • Revise policies and procedures so that prior pay information is no longer disclosed when responding to requests for employment verification and reference checks either entirely or from employers in Maryland or one of the other jurisdictions prohibiting such an inquiry.

For more information, contact Julie at 301-961-6099 or jareddig@lerchearly.com.

Montgomery County Council Considers Legislation to Amend its Ban the Box Law

Michael NearyMichael Neary

A proposed Montgomery County bill greatly expands the County’s law prohibiting employers from asking about the criminal histories of job applicants until after an initial interview. In 2014, the County passed its “Ban the Box” law, which applies to employers with fifteen or more employees. Councilmember Will Jawando proposed an amendment reducing the employee threshold from fifteen to one on July 29, 2020. If passed, any employer in the County employing one individual would have to comply with the mandates of the Ban the Box law.

What Else is in the Proposed Bill?

The proposed legislation also would push the timeline back for when an employer could inquire about criminal histories from after a first interview until after the employer makes a conditional offer of employment. Further, as currently drafted, the bill would prohibit employers from asking about certain criminal offenses. Under the proposed legislation, employers could not ask about or, run a criminal records check to discover, whether the applicant has:

  1. Any arrest records that did not lead to a conviction;
  2. A first conviction for:
    a. Trespass;
    b. Disturbing the peace; or
    c. Second degree assault;
  3. A conviction for a misdemeanor if at least three years have passed since:
    a. The date of conviction; and
    b. The date any period of incarceration for the misdemeanor has ended;
  4. Juvenile records deemed confidential by statute; or
  5. Convictions that have been expunged.

The bill also prohibits employers from inquiring about these offenses when considering current employees for promotions.

The legislation delegates to the County Executive responsibility for preparing implementing regulations and regulations necessary to notify employees and employers of their rights and responsibilities under the legislation.

How Would the Bill Impact Employers?

If passed, the bill would significantly limit employer’s ability to investigate the criminal histories of applicants. The current Ban the Box law simply regulates the timeline for when employers can check the criminal histories of applicants. The public policy behind the current law is that employers may be willing to hire an applicant with a criminal history if the information is learned after the applicant has an opportunity to make a good impression during an initial interview. The proposed legislation, however, would ban inquiry into certain offenses preventing employers from considering them at all during the hiring process. The list of excluded offenses includes what some would consider more than simple nuisance crimes. For instance, a conviction for second-degree assault in Maryland can result from a defendant intentionally or recklessly causing physical contact or physical harm to another.

The legislation also could significantly slow down the hiring process. Employers would not discover an applicant’s criminal history until the end of the hiring process meaning employers might have to start the search again if the employer disqualifies a successful candidate because of a criminal record.

The Council held a public hearing on the bill on September 15, 2020 at which five speakers testified. The Council referred the bill to the Health & Human Services and Public Safety Committees for consideration. The council staff issued a work session staff report to the Committees on September 23, 2020. The next step is for the two Committees to make a recommendation to the full Council on the bill.

For more information, contact Michael at 301-657-0740 or mjneary@lerchearly.com.