EEOC Issues Guidance For Employers Considering Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccine Policies

Michael NearyMichael Neary

On December 16, 2020, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) updated its COVID-19 guidance to address how a COVID-19 vaccine interacts with the equal employment opportunity laws enforced by EEOC. We are likely months away from pharmaceutical companies making the vaccine generally available to the public. But the EEOC guidance is a good resource for employers thinking through whether to institute a mandatory COVID-19 vaccine policy when that day comes.
Continue Reading

Avoid Liability with Express Disclaimers in Employee Manuals and Handbooks

Josh SchmandJosh Schmand

Last month, in Sanchez v. Whole Foods Mkt. Grp., Inc., the United States District Court for the District of Maryland reaffirmed the general rule that express disclaimers in employee manuals and handbooks will protect employers from creating unintended implied contracts under Maryland law.

This is a good reminder of the importance of including clear and conspicuous disclaimers, even as simple and overt as “this manual is not a contract,” because absent such language employee manuals and handbooks can create contractual obligations for employers.
Continue Reading

Montgomery County Council Enacts Legislation Amending the County’s Ban the Box Law

Michael NearyMichael Neary

Well that happened fast. As discussed in my prior article, the Montgomery County Council was considering a bill to amend the County’s Ban the Box law first introduced in late July. Since mid-September, the Council was awaiting a report on the merits of the bill from the Health & Human Services and Public Safety Committees. The Council received that report on November 10 and promptly voted to pass the bill the same day.
Continue Reading

Voluntary Acceptance of a Transfer May Waive Employees’ Claims in Maryland and Virginia

Recognition of “Constructive Demotion” Claims Seems Imminent.

Lauri ClearyLauri Cleary

In October, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed in Laird v. Fairfax County, Virginia, that an employee voluntarily accepting a lateral transfer to another position (there, to settle a disability discrimination claim) may not be able to establish discrimination or retaliation just because the new job is not all she had hoped.

To make out a viable claim, the employee must suffer an “adverse employment action” such that the transfer resulted in “a significant detriment” to the employee.
Continue Reading

COVID-19 in the Workplace – Employer Recording and Reporting Requirements

Employers may have obligations to record and report cases of COVID-19 in the workplace.

Employment/Labor GroupEmployment/Labor Group

Recording Requirement

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) revised enforcement memorandum provides that under OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements, COVID-19 is a recordable illness, and thus employers are responsible for recording cases of COVID-19, if:

  1. The case is a confirmed case of COVID-19;
  2. The case is work-related*; and
  3. The case involves one or more general recording criteria*.

*An illness is work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either causes or contributes to a condition or significantly aggravates a pre-existing illness.
Continue Reading

D.C. Enacts New Law Requiring Sexual Harassment Training by Employers of Tipped Employees (and Associated Reporting Requirements); Posting; and Notice to Employees of Employment Laws

Marc EngelMarc Engel

The District of Columbia enacted important legislation which mandates sexual harassment training for tipped employees (and associated harassment reporting requirements for employers with tipped employees). The new law also mandates postings in the workplace as well as notice to employees of various employment laws.

Overview

By way of background, the District of Columbia, in 2018 enacted the Tipped Wage Worker Fairness Amendment Act (the “Act”).
Continue Reading

Maryland Employers Must End the Inquiry into Applicant Wage History

They Also Must Provide Applicants with Wage Ranges for Open Positions

Julie ReddigJulie Reddig

The Maryland legislature has joined approximately 25 other state and local jurisdictions in restricting employer use of applicant pay history to determine future pay if the applicant is hired for a position. Instead, Maryland employers must set pay ranges for open positions based on job-specific criteria, without regard to an applicant’s prior earnings.

Specifically, Maryland employers are prohibited from requesting that applicants provide prior pay information.
Continue Reading

Montgomery County Makes It Easier for Employees to Prove Unlawful Harassment

Marc EngelMarc Engel

Last month, the Montgomery County (Maryland) Council enacted amendments to the county’s anti-discrimination statute, which substantially lowers the standard for proving unlawful hostile harassment claims.

The amendment was signed into law on October 16, 2020 and takes effect on January 15, 2021. As discussed below, the amendments are likely to have a profound impact upon employers.

Overview

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by local, state, and federal law (Title VII).
Continue Reading

Virginia Ban on Non-Competes for “Low” Wage Employees

Josh SchmandJosh Schmand

Along with a number of other employer friendly laws passed this summer (Values Act and Wage Theft Law), Virginia has joined Maryland in prohibiting non-compete agreements with certain “low” wage workers.

What is a non-compete agreement?

Under the new law, a “covenant not to compete” or non-compete agreement is an agreement between an employer and employee that restrains, prohibits, or otherwise restricts an individual’s ability, following the termination of the individual’s employment, to compete with his/her former employer.
Continue Reading

Montgomery County Council Considers Legislation to Amend its Ban the Box Law

Michael NearyMichael Neary

A proposed Montgomery County bill greatly expands the County’s law prohibiting employers from asking about the criminal histories of job applicants until after an initial interview. In 2014, the County passed its “Ban the Box” law, which applies to employers with fifteen or more employees. Councilmember Will Jawando proposed an amendment reducing the employee threshold from fifteen to one on July 29, 2020.
Continue Reading